Servers

Get server

The easiest way to retrieve a specific server is by its unique ID:

$server = $service->server('{serverId}');

List servers

You can list servers in two different ways:

  • return an overview of each server (ID, name and links)
  • return detailed information for each server

Knowing which option to use might help save unnecessary bandwidth and reduce latency.

// overview
$servers = $service->serverList();

// detailed
$servers = $service->serverList(true);

URL parameters for filtering servers

Name Description Type
image The image ID string
flavor The flavor ID string
name The server name string
status The server status. Servers contain a status attribute that indicates the current server state. You can filter on the server status when you complete a list servers request, and the server status is returned in the response body. For a full list, please consult OpenCloud\Compute\Constants\ServerState string
changes-since Value for checking for changes since a previous request A valid ISO 8601 dateTime (2011-01-24T17:08Z)
RAX-SI:image_schedule If scheduled images enabled or not. If the value is TRUE, the list contains all servers that have an image schedule resource set on them. If the value is set to FALSE, the list contains all servers that do not have an image schedule. bool

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Create server

Using an image

Now we’re ready to create our instance:

$server = $compute->server();

$server->create(array(
    'name'     => 'My lovely server',
    'imageId'  => '{imageId}',
    'flavorId' => '{flavorId}',
));

It’s always best to be defensive when executing functionality over HTTP; you can achieve this best by wrapping calls in a try/catch block. It allows you to debug your failed operations in a graceful and efficient manner.

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Using a bootable volume

Firstly we need to find our volume using their IDs.

$bootableVolume = $client->volumeService()->volume('{volumeId}');

Now we’re ready to create our instance:

$server = $compute->server();

$response = $server->create(array(
    'name'     => 'My lovely server',
    'volume'   => $bootableVolume,
    'flavorId' => '{flavorId}'
));

It’s always best to be defensive when executing functionality over HTTP; you can achieve this best by wrapping calls in a try/catch block. It allows you to debug your failed operations in a graceful and efficient manner.

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Create parameters

Name Description Type Required
name The server name. The name that you specify in a create request becomes the initial host name of the server. After the server is built, if you change the server name in the API or change the host name directly, the names are not kept in sync. string Yes
flavor A populated OpenCloud\Compute\Resource\Flavor object representing your chosen flavor object Yes
image A populated OpenCloud\Compute\Resource\Image object representing your chosen image object No, if volume is specified
volume A populated OpenCloud\Volume\Resource\Volume object representing your chosen bootable volume object No, if image is specified
volumeDeleteOnTermination true if the bootable volume should be deleted when the server is terminated; false, otherwise boolean No; default = false
OS-DCF:diskConfig The disk configuration value. You can use two options: AUTO or MANUAL. AUTO means the server is built with a single partition the size of the target flavor disk. The file system is automatically adjusted to fit the entire partition. This keeps things simple and automated. AUTO is valid only for images and servers with a single partition that use the EXT3 file system. This is the default setting for applicable Rackspace base images.MANUAL means the server is built using whatever partition scheme and file system is in the source image. If the target flavor disk is larger, the remaining disk space is left unpartitioned. This enables images to have non-EXT3 file systems, multiple partitions, and so on, and enables you to manage the disk configuration. string No
networks An array of populated OpenCloud\Compute\Resource\Network objects that indicate which networks your instance resides in. array No
metadata An array of arbitrary data (key-value pairs) that adds additional meaning to your server. array No
keypair You can install a registered keypair onto your newly created instance, thereby providing scope for keypair-based authentication. array No
personality Files that you can upload to your newly created instance’s filesystem. array No
user_data User script to configure the server at launch time string No

Creating a server with keypairs

In order to provision an instance with a saved keypair (allowing you to SSH in without passwords), you create your server using the same operation as usual, with one extra parameter:

$server = $compute->server();

$server->create(array(
    'name'     => 'New server',
    'imageId'  => '{imageId}',
    'flavorId' => '{flavorId}',
    'keypair'  => 'main_key'
));

So, as you can see, you specify the name of an existing keypair that you previously created on the API.

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Creating a server with personality files

Before you execute the create operation, you can add “personality” files to your OpenCloud\Compute\Resource\Server object. These files are structured as a flat array.

$server->addFile('/var/test_file', 'FILE CONTENT');

As you can see, the first parameter represents the filename, and the second is a string representation of its content. When the server is created these files will be created on its local filesystem. For more information about server personality files, please consult the official documentation.

Update server

You can update certain attributes of an existing server instance. These attributes are detailed in the next section.

$server->update(array(
   'name' => 'NEW SERVER NAME'
));

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Updatable attributes

name description
name The name of the server. If you edit the server name, the server host name does not change. Also, server names are not guaranteed to be unique.
accessIPv4 The IP version 4 address.
accessIPv6 The IP version 6 address.

Updating the access IP address(es)

For example, you may have a private cloud with internal addresses in the 10.1.x range. However, you can access a server via a firewall device at address 50.57.94.244. In this case, you can change the accessIPv4 attribute to point to the firewall:

$server->update(array('accessIPv4' => '50.57.94.244'));

When a client application retrieves the server’s information, it will know that it needs to use the accessIPv4 address to connect to the server, and not the IP address assigned to one of the network interfaces.

Retrieving the server’s IP address

The Server::ip() method is used to retrieve the server’s IP address. It has one optional parameter: the format (either IPv4 or IPv6) of the address to return (by default, it returns the IPv4 address):

// IPv4
echo $server->ip();
echo $server->ip(4);

// IPv6
echo $server->ip(6);

Delete server

$server->delete();

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